• Han Butler

Who I Am According to the 16 Personalities Test


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I've seen a lot of people take the 16 Personalities test, and I've heard a lot of good things about it so I was pretty intrigued to try it out. I was sort of expecting a run of the mill buzzfeed type quiz that doesn't really tell you much about yourself, but I was pleasantly surprised with the in-depth questions they ask and the detail they go into with the results. I was pretty happy with my result and it actually opened my mind a bit to the situations in my life and how to deal with them, so I thought I'd share it with you. I've tried to condense it down as much as I could, but it's still pretty long compared to my usual content - I hope you make it to the end!


WHO I AM ACCORDING TO THE 16 PERSONALITIES TEST


Personality Type: Mediator


Introduction:

Mediator personalities are true idealists, always looking for the hint of good in even the worst of people and events, searching for ways to make things better. While they may be perceived as calm, reserved, or even shy, Mediators have an inner flame and passion that can truly shine. Comprising just 4% of the population, the risk of feeling misunderstood is unfortunately high for the Mediator personality type - but when they find like-minded people to spend their time with, the harmony they feel will be a fountain of joy and inspiration.


Mediators are guided by their principles. When deciding how to move forward, they will look to honour, beauty, morality and virtue - Mediators are led by the purity of their intent, not rewards and punishments. They're proud of this quality, and rightly so, but not everyone understands the drive behind these feelings, and it can lead to isolation.


At their best, these qualities enable Mediators to communicate deeply with others. Fantasy worlds in particular fascinate Mediators, more than any other personality type. The strength of their visionary communication style lends itself well to creative works, and it comes as no surprise that many famous Mediators are poets, writers and actors. Understanding themselves and their place in the world is important to Mediators, and they explore these ideas by projecting themselves into their work.


If they are not careful, Mediators can lose themselves in their quest for good and neglect the day-to-day upkeep that life demands. Mediators often drift into deep thought, enjoying contemplating the hypothetical and the philosophical more than any other personality type.


Luckily, Mediator's affection, creativity, altruism and idealism will always come back, rewarding them and those they love perhaps not with logic and utility, but with a world views that inspires compassion, kindness and beauty wherever they go.


Mediator Strengths:


Seek and Value Harmony - People with the Mediator personality type have no interest in having power over others, and don't much care for domineering attitudes at all. They prefer a more democratic approach, and work hard to ensure that every voice and perspective is heard.


Open-Minded and Flexible - A live-and-let-live attitude comes naturally to Mediators, and they dislike being constrained by rules. Mediators give the benefit of the doubt too, and so long as their principles and ideas are not being challenged, they'll support others' right to do what they think is right.


Very Creative - Mediators combine their visionary nature with their open-mindedness to allow them to see things from unconventional perspectives. Being able to connect many far-flung dots into a single theme, it's no wonder that many Mediators are celebrated poets and authors.


Passionate and Energetic - When something captures Mediators' imagination and speaks to their beliefs, they go all in, dedicating their time, energy, thoughts and emotions to the project.


Dedicated and Hard-Working - While others focusing on the challenges of the moment may give up when the going gets tough, Mediators (especially Assertive ones) have the benefit of their far-reaching vision to help them through. Knowing that what they are doing is meaningful gives them a sense of purpose and even courage when it comes to accomplishing something they believe in.


Mediator Weaknesses:


Too Idealistic - Mediators often take their idealism too far, setting themselves up for disappointment as, again and again, evil things happen in the world. This is true on a personal level too, as Mediators may not just idealise their partners, but idolise them, forgetting that no one is perfect.


Too Altruistic - Mediators sometimes see themselves as selfish, but only because they want to give so much more than they are able to. This becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy, as they try to push themselves to commit to a chosen cause or person, forgetting to take care of the needs of others in their lives, and especially themselves.


Impractical - When something captures Mediators' imagination, they can neglect practical matters like day-to-day maintenance and simple pleasures. Sometimes people with the Mediator personality type will take the asceticism so far as to neglect eating and drinking as they pursue their passion or cause.


Romantic Relationships:


While it can be a challenge to separate long-fostered fantasy from reality, Mediators' tendency to focus their attention on just a few people in their lives means that they will approach new relationships wholeheartedly, with a sense of inherent value, dedication and trust.


As a relationship takes hold, Mediators will show themselves to be passionate, hopeless romantics, while still respecting their partners' independence. They take the time to understand those they care about, while at the same time helping them to learn, grow and change.


At their best, Mediators do everything they can to be the ideal partner, staying true to themselves and encouraging their partners to do the same. Mediators take their time in becoming physically intimate so that they can get to know their partners, using their creativity to understand their wants and needs, and adapt to them. People with this personality type are generous in their affection, with a clear preference for putting the pleasure of their partners first - it is in knowing that their partners are satisfied that Mediators truly feel the most pleasure.


Friendships:


The true friends of Mediators tend to be few and far between, but those that make the cut are often friends for life. They crave the depth of mutual human understanding, but tire easily in social situations; they are excellent at reading into others' feelings and motivations, but are often unwilling to provide others the same insight into themselves - it's as though they like the idea of human contact, but not the reality of social contact.


Friendships are earned on their own merit, by dint of the intuitive respect Mediators have for those with similar principles and values, rather than more practical alignments like those of coworkers.


If Mediators' shields are properly navigated and they decide to open up and trust another person, a strong, stable friendship will ensue, marked by passionate support and idealism, subtle poetic wit, and a level of emotional insight that is hard to match. Their friends will be rewarded with calm, sensitivity and depth, and an ever-present desire to help, learn and grow. But even the most confident and assertive Mediators will only be able to keep up this relaxed and present exterior for so long.


Mediators will always need to disappear for a while, removing themselves from others so they can re-center on their own minds and feelings. Often enough people with the Mediator personality type will emerge from this time alone having come to some momentous decision that even their closest friends didn't know was weighing on them, evading even the option of receiving the sort of support and advice they so readily give.


Parenthood:


From the start, Mediator parents are warm, loving and supportive, and take immeasurable joy in the wide-eyed wonder of their children as they explore, learn and grow. People with the Mediator personality type will give their children the freedom they need to do this, keeping an open mind and letting their children gain their own sense of understanding. At the same time, Mediator parents will try to provide a backdrop to this freedom and experience, establishing a set of morals and values that guide that liberty with a sense of personal responsibility.


In some ways, Mediators' tendency to hide their inner selves from view can be an advantage in parenting, as they are able to portray themselves as good role models on the outside, shielding their loved ones not just from their own occasional anger and depression, but from the broader evils in the world as well. This helps Mediators to demonstrate outwardly the moral lessons they want their children to adopt, and at the same time establish a sense of harmony in the household.


Career Paths:


It's more challenging for Mediators to find a satisfying career than any other type. Though intelligent, the regimented learning style of most schools makes long years earning an advanced degree a formidable undertaking for people with the Mediator personalty type. They often wish that they could just be, doing what they love without the stress and rigor of professional life.


Seemingly every Mediators' dream growing up - to become an author. While a novel is a classic choice, it is rarely an accessible one, and there are many viable options for freedom-loving Mediators. The internet brings to the world the opportunities of blogging and freelance work - as organisations come to depend on Mediator personality types, with their gift for language and written expression, to take heir rougher translations and stale pitches and inject them with a sense of beauty and poetry.


The real beauty here is that it takes a core interest that people with the Mediator personality type share, while helping a cause they believe in, independently, through creative expression and personal growth, and it makes it applicable to any interest there is. There will always be a need, and now more than ever, to win people's hearts and minds with the written word.


Where Mediators will not thrive is in a high-stress, team-heavy, busy environment that burdens them with bureaucracy and tedium. Mediators need to be able to work with creativity and consideration - high-pressure salespeople they are not. It can be a challenge to avoid these roles, as they are the basis for so much starting work, and it's often a risk to break away into something less dependable, but rewarding. To find a career that resonates with Mediators' values though, that's more than just a job, sometimes it's just what needs to be done.


Conclusion:


Few personality types are as poetic and kind-hearted as Mediators. Their altruism and vivid imagination allow Mediators to overcome many challenging obstacles, more often than not brightening the lives of those around them. Mediators' creativity is invaluable in many areas, including their own personal growth.


Yet Mediators can be easily tripped up in areas where idealism and altruism are more of a liability than an asset. Whether it is finding (or keeping) a partner, making friends, reaching dazzling heights on the career ladder or planning for the future, Mediators need to put in a conscious effort to develop their weaker traits and additional skills.



If you made it to the end, well done and thank you, I know it was a bit of a long read. I'd love to know what your personality type is, so let me know down in the comment section below.


Love, Han


xo



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